Atlas Model Railroad Co. - 36" X 80" Door Layout Info Needed
Atlas Model Railroad Co.
Username:
Password:
Save Password


Register
Forgot Password?
  Atlas Model Home   Forums   Events Calendar   Rules   FAQ  
Active Topics | Members | Online Users | Forum Archive | Basic Forum (Mac / Netscape Users) | Search | Statistics
[ Active Members: 0 | Anonymous Members: 0 | Guests: 45 ]  [ Total: 45 ]  [ Newest Member: jjbern ]
 All Forums
 Atlas Model Railroad Forums
 N Scale Model Railroad Forum
 36" X 80" Door Layout Info Needed
Next Page
 Forum Locked |   Printer Friendly
Author Previous Topic: N Scale Atlas Signal System Components Topic Next Topic: 1947 Layout - N Scale Railroading Mar/April 2012
Page: of 2

oldbill_indy

Posted - 2012 February 04 :  6:01:37 PM  Show Profile
How do you mount a 36" X 80" door from the floor and do you top it with 2" foam? Does anyone suspend it with some type of brackets from a wall without legs? Is there a how to anywhere on the web?
I insist that Victor gets his Atlantic now!

Country: USA | Posts: 1020

GTIRR

Posted - 2012 February 04 :  7:36:17 PM  Show Profile
A pair of very light weight saw horses 36" long
would work great. Or you could frame the door with
1"x 3" lumber am make some legs for it.
gtirr



Country: | Posts: 352 Go to Top of Page

DJCONWAY

Posted - 2012 February 04 :  8:19:08 PM  Show Profile
I used a pair of folding table legs that I picked up at home depot.


Do your part buy stuff!

Country: USA | Posts: 2536 Go to Top of Page

3railguy

Posted - 2012 February 04 :  10:29:28 PM  Show Profile
I agree on folding legs of the church table variety. Glueing and nailing 1x4 firring strips to the underside of the door will give the legs something solid to screw into. Beware of folding legs of the cheaper variety. They tend to wobble sending trains to the floor.

Sawhorses work fine too as long as they are solid and have a wide footing span on the floor. Otherwise, they teeter totter and have a tendancy to topple over.

For wall brackets, Not advisable. But if you insist, probably the largest closet shelf brackets you can find. You could glue and nail 2x4's across the underside of the door then screw the shelf brackets into those using at least No 10 dia screws. You also want to make sure you screw the shelf brackets into studs behind your wall. Or use expansion anchors if attaching to a concrete wall.


John Long

Country: USA | Posts: 709 Go to Top of Page

storm

Posted - 2012 February 04 :  10:37:36 PM  Show Profile
I would not use wall brackets. Door's are to wide to reach across making the far side unreachable.

Jeff
http://www.pantherhobbies.com
http://www.scalerailsonline.com/galleries/membergalleries/storm
http://www.youtube.com/user/Qui3tSt0rm
http://jeffscpline.blogspot.com/

Country: Canada | Posts: 184 Go to Top of Page

3railguy

Posted - 2012 February 05 :  12:03:34 AM  Show Profile
quote:
Originally posted by storm

I would not use wall brackets. Door's are to wide to reach across making the far side unreachable.



Agreed. 24" wide is fine. 30" wide is max. 36" is pushing it a bit far.


John Long

Country: USA | Posts: 709 Go to Top of Page

Dan Brown

Posted - 2012 February 08 :  4:35:18 PM  Show Profile
The club I belong to have a door layout for shows. We place it on a table for shows and work on. Stands up on end to store. If will be setup and not moved could build frame and place legs as most layouts.


Country: USA | Posts: 57 Go to Top of Page

MarkJ

Posted - 2012 February 08 :  9:36:57 PM  Show Profile
Oldbill indy: Many years ago MR did an article on constructing a n scale layout on a door. The article title is “The N Scale Mohawk Division” by Lou Sassi and appears in the December 93 issue. They mounted folding legs to the door by first adding 1x4s across the width of the door to support the leg hardware. These boards were fastened to the door near the edges since the middle of the door is hollow. Regarding your question about a layer of 2” foam, yes, they added a layer first and then added a layer of plywood with cutouts for below-track features. I suppose you could use foam instead of plywood to reduce the overall weight of the layout if that’s an issue you're concerned about.


Country: USA | Posts: 210 Go to Top of Page

pg5

Posted - 2012 February 09 :  11:32:28 AM  Show Profile
When MR editor Marty McGuirk built the Carolina Central as a project railroad on a 28” by 80” door over 10 years ago, he had an illustration for using a 1” by 4” dimensional lumber to reinforce the bottom of the door to provide a mounting location for folding legs, as some posters have mentioned here. (By the way, Marty found that standard folding legs kept the layout at too low a height so he added pipe to the legs as extenders. He had a picture of that in the articles as well as I recall.) This series of articles was re-published by Kalmbach in the book “N Scale Railroading: Getting Started in the Hobby: First Edition” in 2000. You can not buy this book anymore from Kalmbach as Marty updated the book and now it is the “Second Edition.” The Carolina Central project railroad in the back of that first edition book was replaced with another project railroad that Marty built that was more complex and not done on a hollow core door. You may be able to find the First Edition on used book websites but the places I spot-checked either did not have it or it is insanely expensive.

You may be able to find it at your local library. Mine actually has the first edition. If your library does not have it but is part of that inter-library loan network, they should be able to get it from another library. Make sure you get the First Edition from 2000.

Another comment: Carl Swanson, during the brief time he was on the MR staff, wrote an article about using Unitrack for the Carolina Central. He required a 32” by 80” hollow core door though because the curve radius was larger. I have some notes on that so PM me if interested.



Country: USA | Posts: 38 Go to Top of Page

GP38-2freak

Posted - 2012 February 09 :  2:21:21 PM  Show Profile
Some years ago we had a very interesting thread here about door layouts...I'll found this link which should help you :-)
http://forum.atlasrr.com/forum/topic.asp?ARCHIVE=true&TOPIC_ID=43495

enjoy it!!!

Tim



Country: Germany | Posts: 318 Go to Top of Page

davefoxx

Posted - 2012 February 09 :  5:14:43 PM  Show Profile
That Carolina Central-inspired hollow-core door ("HCD") layout thread was a lot of fun, and a lot of good information about HCD layouts can be gleaned from it.

One word of warning: If I had to do it again, I would definitely weigh my options for table legs. I built mine according to the plans for the Carolina Central, which was folding table legs extended with 1" electrical conduit. Dowels were hammered into the bottom of the table legs, so that tee nuts and lag bolts could be used to level the layout. I glued and screwed 1" x 4" pine across the width of the door to provide some "meat" to install the table legs. As pointed out earlier, there's nothing in the center of the door that will hold screws well. It IS a hollow core door, you know.

Folding table legs generally look more finished than legs built from lumber and are more convenient when moving the layout. But, the table does have some end-to-end swaying, if bumped. Not so bad that the table would fall over, but a rocking layout can knock the trains off the track. I pushed my layout up against a wall on one end, which helped keep the table much more stable. Dave Vollmer has said the same thing about his PRR Juniata Division layout. If I were not able to push the layout against a wall (preferably an end, so that reach is not a problem), I would probably build stiffer legs from lumber.

Oh, and wall brackets for a 36" deep layout will not work very well. You could certainly custom build some large wall brackets, but, again, reaching into the layout will become a real problem.

Finally, I did install 2" foam on top of my door, which allowed me to build scenery above and below track level. Remember, many railroads are built on fills and cuts.

Hope this helps,
Dave Foxx



Country: USA | Posts: 979 Go to Top of Page

Lemosteam

Posted - 2012 February 11 :  02:15:10 AM  Show Profile  Visit Lemosteam's Homepage
If you are building legs of some sort anyway, why not make a pair of 36" wide by 36" long angle soupports and hinge them to the wall on a verical axis 72' apart. If you add rotating catches to the ends of the horizontal mambers, the HCD could be slid away from the wall for working on it to elimnate the reach issues. Pins or screws could be used from underneath to keep the supports from parallelogramming when the HCD is in mounted to them running state (EDIT: the sketch below wouls not work after posting so send me a PM if you want a drawing emailt to you.

HCDHCDHCDHCDHCDHCDHCDHCD
========================|
xx x
x x x
H x x
H x x
x x x
x x x
x x
x x
x x
x x
x x
H
H

The supports fold against a wall when not in use and the hcd could stand on end against the wall when not in use or hang it behind another door.

This will still work if you want partability as any foldup legs could be placed within the 72" width of the angle braces when open allowing the HCD to still sit on the supports.


PRR- The Standard Railroad of MY world!
John "Lemosteam" LeMerise
http://www.youtube.com/Lemosteam
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lemosteam/

Edited by - Lemosteam on 2012 February 11 02:20:10 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 652 Go to Top of Page

Roger Perkins

Posted - 2012 February 11 :  10:39:18 AM  Show Profile  Visit Roger Perkins's Homepage
I have been designing a layout with the hopes that we will have more room in the basement of our next house.

I have considered using folding legs such as those on the "church" banquet tables.

I already know I like 2" extruded polystyrene, and I know that it is sufficiently sturdy that one can allow a 6 to 8" over-hang beyond the width or length of a plywood underlayment.

Would using 36" x 80" doors for a multi-module layout be less expensive that using 3/4" plywood which would need additional braces?

My current design includes 5 modules, each 4' x 8' of layout surface area. The 4' x 8'
2" extruded polystyrene would be placed on the door.
Thanks.
PS: I checked the closest building supply store and learned five sets of legs, five hcd doors of this size and five sheets of 4' x 8'
2" extruded polystyrene would cost about $444.
The doors are $220 compared to five 4' x 8' sheets of 15/32" plywood at $75.85. This is a "no-brainer" on paper assuming the support lumber for the plywood is less than $144.



Edited by - Roger Perkins on 2012 February 11 11:06:04 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 3351 Go to Top of Page

fordhamroad

Posted - 2012 February 11 :  12:33:31 PM  Show Profile
- Hi Olb bill indy-
Not quite a door, but I remember seeing years ago an article about a small layout in a home.

The layout was on an approximately door sized frame. It was laid out horizontally against the wall. It was hinged to swing upward against the wall, into the top part of a bookcase - type cabinet. The bottom part of the cabinet , upon which the layout frame rested when down, had doors, shelves for trainstuff., formed a cabinet. The bottom of the layout was finished in plywood panelling, and had a very large sturdy wooden framed picture. When the layout was away, you saw a nice stained cabinet with a matching plywood panel over it and a large picture in the center. When the layout was down, you saw a nice layout supported on the wall side by hinges and the cabinet, and on its front side, by the heavy picture frame, which was designed to swing down and become a front leg support. The whole layout could be fitted against a wall, one foot for the layout and two feet for the cabinet. It would only take up two feet of wall space in a living room, rec room, or multible use basement room.
It would be a great layout to live with, easily put away, with train and or /removable building storage, room for the wiring and a tethered powerpack inside the base cabinet.

I never had quite the space to build it, still think it would be a neat idea.

Roger



Country: USA | Posts: 804 Go to Top of Page

Lemosteam

Posted - 2012 February 11 :  1:27:05 PM  Show Profile  Visit Lemosteam's Homepage
quote:
Originally posted by Roger Perkins

I have been designing a layout with the hopes that we will have more room in the basement of our next house.

I have considered using folding legs such as those on the "church" banquet tables.

I already know I like 2" extruded polystyrene, and I know that it is sufficiently sturdy that one can allow a 6 to 8" over-hang beyond the width or length of a plywood underlayment.

Would using 36" x 80" doors for a multi-module layout be less expensive that using 3/4" plywood which would need additional braces?

My current design includes 5 modules, each 4' x 8' of layout surface area. The 4' x 8'
2" extruded polystyrene would be placed on the door.
Thanks.
PS: I checked the closest building supply store and learned five sets of legs, five hcd doors of this size and five sheets of 4' x 8'
2" extruded polystyrene would cost about $444.
The doors are $220 compared to five 4' x 8' sheets of 15/32" plywood at $75.85. This is a "no-brainer" on paper assuming the support lumber for the plywood is less than $144.



Lowes has 38 x 80 HCD slabs for $26 each (5x26=$130) http://www.lowes.com/pd_10710-42734-10710_4294859728_4294937087_?productId=3037935&Ns=p_product_prd_lis_ord_nbr|0||p_product_qty_sales_dollar|1&pl=1¤tURL=%2Fpl_Interior%2BSlab%2BDoors_4294859728_4294937087_%3FNs%3Dp_product_prd_lis_ord_nbr%7C0%7C%7Cp_product_qty_sales_dollar%7C1&facetInfo= (you'll have to copy and paste the links)

2"x4'x8' rigid insulation at 24.88 (5x25=1
http://www.lowes.com/pd_15357-46086-697708_4294858106_4294937087_?productId=3365572&Ns=p_product_prd_lis_ord_nbr|0||p_product_qty_sales_dollar|1&pl=1¤tURL=%2Fpl_Insulated%2BSheathing_4294858106_4294937087_%3FNs%3Dp_product_prd_lis_ord_nbr%7C0%7C%7Cp_product_qty_sales_dollar%7C1&facetInfo=25)

and 5 sets of legs at @20 ech= $10http://www.lowes.com/pd_21454-46882-97068PKDLG_4294856625_4294937087_?catalogId=10051&productId=3040984&Ne=4294937087&N=4294856625&identifier=Metal+Table+Legs&langId=-1&Ns=p_product_prd_lis_ord_nbr%7C0%7C%7Cp_product_qty_sales_dollar%7C1&storeId=10151&rpp=24&searchQueryType=10

so 130+125+100= $355 for all of the structural basics...

Oldbill_indy, I see 26+25+20=$71 in your near future!!


PRR- The Standard Railroad of MY world!
John "Lemosteam" LeMerise
http://www.youtube.com/Lemosteam
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lemosteam/

Country: USA | Posts: 652 Go to Top of Page

Roger Perkins

Posted - 2012 February 11 :  1:56:48 PM  Show Profile  Visit Roger Perkins's Homepage
Looks as if the big difference is the door price that you found at Lowes vs. what I found online at Home Depot. That is a $190 less for the project.
Starts to look better with less expensive doors.
Thanks.



Edited by - Roger Perkins on 2012 February 11 4:34:07 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 3351 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 2 Previous Topic: N Scale Atlas Signal System Components Topic Next Topic: 1947 Layout - N Scale Railroading Mar/April 2012  
 Forum Locked |   Printer Friendly
Next Page
Jump To:
Atlas Model Railroad Co. © 1709-2011 Atlas Models Go To Top Of Page
This page was generated in 0.39 seconds. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000