Atlas Model Railroad Co. - When does N Scale officially turn 50?
Atlas Model Railroad Co.
Username:
Password:
Save Password


Register
Forgot Password?
  Atlas Model Home   Forums   Events Calendar   Rules   FAQ  
Active Topics | Members | Online Users | Forum Archive | Basic Forum (Mac / Netscape Users) | Search | Statistics
[ Active Members: 0 | Anonymous Members: 0 | Guests: 91 ]  [ Total: 91 ]  [ Newest Member: RaymondLok ]
 All Forums
 Atlas Model Railroad Forums
 N Scale Model Railroad Forum
 When does N Scale officially turn 50?
Next Page
 Forum Locked |   Topic Locked |   Printer Friendly
Author Previous Topic: New Video: Golden State Model Railroad Museum Topic Next Topic: FVM 3310 33 wide tread wheels
Page: of 10

wm3798

Posted - 2009 December 09 :  1:29:23 PM  Show Profile  Visit wm3798's Homepage
When I look up any of the Google searches that comes up, they pretty much all say "early 60's" but so far I haven't found a definitive date of origin.

Anyone have any better information? I'm thinking the industry might want to come up with some sort of appropriate promotion... I'm sure there are still folks out there saying "It'll never last!" so I think it would be fun to stick it in their eye with a big celebration.

What are some ideas that could be pursued?

Lee
Mill Street Studios - Custom N Scale Offerings.

www.wmrywesternlines.net

Country: USA | Posts: 4416

Spookshow

Posted - 2009 December 09 :  1:38:58 PM  Show Profile  Visit Spookshow's Homepage
I believe the old Lone Star push-toys date all the way back to the late 1950s -



The oldest reference to actual motorized models that I've ever come across is a 1962 Model Railroader advertisement for Arnold's Baldwin switcher.

Cheers,
-Mark



Dear Atlas - Please Make More DME/ICE Models!

Edited by - Spookshow on 2009 December 09 1:39:38 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 5560 Go to Top of Page

keeper

Posted - 2009 December 09 :  1:41:58 PM  Show Profile
Wikipedia says the first commercial models were launched in 1962 by Arnold.
But they also say trains of a similar scale existed as early as 1927...

Thomas


Ageing is inevitable - maturity is optional.

GGR -

Edited by - keeper on 2009 December 09 1:44:23 PM

Country: Germany | Posts: 214 Go to Top of Page

Charlie Vlk

Posted - 2009 December 09 :  2:51:47 PM  Show Profile
Mark-
You came up with a picture of a Lone Star F unit that is different than the rubber band drive F7A normally seen!

Here are the earliest commecial roots I've found for N Scale:
1959 1:180 Trix Rollmodelle ("Schiebetrix") Trix produces metal pushtoys in 1:180 scale
1960 1:200 Arnold Arnold rapido 200 introduced metal electric trains in 1:200 scale
1961 1:160 Lone Star Diecast push toys with pin and look couplers running on 8mm gauge diecast track.
The entire history of N Scale-size trains (sub-TT Scale) is more complicated and goes back to at least the early 1920s.

I'd place 1967 as the key year for North American prototype N Scale as the fall of that year is when we started to see Atlas, Aurora Postage Stamp, and Con-Cor equipment as well as upgraded Arnold Rapido equipment.

Charlie Vlk



Country: USA | Posts: 1704 Go to Top of Page

wm3798

Posted - 2009 December 09 :  3:10:50 PM  Show Profile  Visit wm3798's Homepage
Well, in order to be efficient, let's stick to self-propelled 1:160 scale, or at least to 9 mm track (since the scale thing remains an issue of international dispute... Much more critical than global climate change or the war on terror! )

Sounds like 1962 might be the origin of what we'll call "modern" N Scale.

Okay. I'll bring the keg. Where's the party going to be in 2012?

Lee


Mill Street Studios - Custom N Scale Offerings.

www.wmrywesternlines.net

Country: USA | Posts: 4416 Go to Top of Page

NandW

Posted - 2009 December 09 :  3:26:40 PM  Show Profile
I can't vouch for the accuracy of this website, but interesting reading here:

http://www.guidetozscale.com/general/Arnold_Rapido/History/history.html

Mark




Country: Pitcairn Island | Posts: 4227 Go to Top of Page

NandW

Posted - 2009 December 09 :  3:46:28 PM  Show Profile
quote:
Originally posted by wm3798

Well, in order to be efficient, let's stick to self-propelled 1:160 scale, or at least to 9 mm track (since the scale thing remains an issue of international dispute... Much more critical than global climate change or the war on terror! )



Most of the world agrees that N scale is 1:160.

Only two exceptions exist. Exceptions shown in red on this map (UK 1:148, Japan 1:150)



Mark



Country: Pitcairn Island | Posts: 4227 Go to Top of Page

Doug Gosha

Posted - 2009 December 09 :  4:02:00 PM  Show Profile  Visit Doug Gosha's Homepage
If you want to be exact, then you have to specify 1:160 and 9mm track gauge because that is generally accepted as "N scale."

However, I feel that, realistically, Lone Star was the first to even get close to popularizing 9mm gauge and is, essentially the beginning of models of this general size.

They began to produce the motorized models in 1960 with the two British diesel locomotives and so, to me, the 50th birthday will be this next year.

EDIT: And yes, it was 1957 when Lone Star first produced the push-along versions but they were on 8.25mm track.

I guess I would say that 1966 is when N scale really started to take off though. Or, maybe 1967 as Charlie opined.

It's actually a lot more complicated than it first appears.

Doug


Atlas First Generation Locomotives and Treble-O-Lectric - Click on Link
http://www.irwinsjournal.com/a1g/a1glocos

Edited by - Doug Gosha on 2009 December 09 4:14:55 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 1438 Go to Top of Page

wm3798

Posted - 2009 December 09 :  4:31:50 PM  Show Profile  Visit wm3798's Homepage
I say we go with 1960, then, in deference to Lone Star... Plus that means we can have a party sooner!

So, how will you celebrate?
Lee


Mill Street Studios - Custom N Scale Offerings.

www.wmrywesternlines.net

Country: USA | Posts: 4416 Go to Top of Page

Doug Gosha

Posted - 2009 December 09 :  5:53:54 PM  Show Profile  Visit Doug Gosha's Homepage
Heck, I'll just get out all my Lone Star stuff and...oh wait, I don't have to get it all out. It's already out! (No wise cracks, please)

Guess I'll just run it a lot on New Year's.

EDIT: And toast Mssrs. Bob Mills and Sidney Ambridge, of course.

EDIT II: How could I forget Stuart Goss who was the Lone Star engineer who conceived and developed the Treble-O lines. So, a toast to him too. God rest all their souls.

Doug


Atlas First Generation Locomotives and Treble-O-Lectric - Click on Link
http://www.irwinsjournal.com/a1g/a1glocos

Edited by - Doug Gosha on 2009 December 10 09:49:34 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 1438 Go to Top of Page

bob-40

Posted - 2009 December 09 :  11:36:17 PM  Show Profile  Visit bob-40's Homepage
i first became aware of n-scale in hobby shops in late 1967 when i bought my first set: arnold-rapido at sears. model railroader had an article that referenced n-scale models being built by a gentleman in sweden? in the l920's.

rtl

Country: USA | Posts: 210 Go to Top of Page

up1950s

Posted - 2009 December 09 :  11:52:55 PM  Show Profile
" So, how will you celebrate?
Lee "

Drive by Paul's house while laying on the horn sounds like fun .


Richie Dost Photos http://picasaweb.google.com/up1950s


Country: | Posts: 10219 Go to Top of Page

Lenny53

Posted - 2009 December 10 :  05:25:58 AM  Show Profile
quote:
Originally posted by Charlie Vlk

Mark-
You came up with a picture of a Lone Star F unit that is different than the rubber band drive F7A normally seen!

Charlie Vlk



This is the first version of Treble-O, they're non motorized die cast models in the same style as Matchbox cars and Triang Minic (mini) ships, and you pull them along sectional pieces of all metal track. My first samples were left under the tree by Santa in 1958.



Country: Canada | Posts: 1247 Go to Top of Page

GimpLizard

Posted - 2009 December 10 :  07:12:44 AM  Show Profile
My kid brother was given a Lone-Star set, for Christmas, around 1968 (as I recall). The track was all plastic, including the "rail", which had a tendency to chip away. Leaving rather large gaps in it. Poor kid was very disappointed.

"They don't call it the GREAT Northern for nothing."

Country: USA | Posts: 755 Go to Top of Page

trainbuff1

Posted - 2009 December 10 :  09:00:14 AM  Show Profile
I make my take on this as I have said many times!

In 1960 at the Harrogate and Brighton toy fair, the first line of Treble-0-Lectric was introduced. This line used many of the push toy castings with plastic wheels to run on 9mm track.. In order to fit a motor inside they used a Class 23 Deltic loco and a Class 24.. That is why they chose an F unit to fit the motor in it.. That was in June of 1962 and was brought here by Montgomery Ward..

So, to sum it up.. November of 1960 at a toy show in England the first N Scale was introduced by Lone Star.. Say what you want this is the Birthday of N Scale.. I too have a large collection of Lone Star and have been working on the History and Production of it with some former Employees of the Company..

Todd Treaster, NY,S&A




Country: USA | Posts: 569 Go to Top of Page

Brakie

Posted - 2009 December 10 :  10:05:40 AM  Show Profile
I call it 1967..That's when I saw my first Atlas N Scale train set and other N Scale brands such as Aurora Postage Stamp,Con-Cor and Arnold Rapido..

I never counted Lone Star as a serious model manufacturer since what they made look like toys and not models.



Larry
Summerset Ry.

Country: USA | Posts: 7537 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 10 Previous Topic: New Video: Golden State Model Railroad Museum Topic Next Topic: FVM 3310 33 wide tread wheels  
 Forum Locked |   Topic Locked |   Printer Friendly
Next Page
Jump To:
Atlas Model Railroad Co. © 1709-2011 Atlas Models Go To Top Of Page
This page was generated in 3.22 seconds. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000