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 Model gravel parking lot
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Author Previous Topic: A fun little video Topic Next Topic: Thank you MTH  

elansp

Posted - 2009 September 24 :  4:54:25 PM  Show Profile
All- I need to work on modeling a large gravel parking lot (for a drive-in theatre). Base is rigid insulation. Can anyone provide some help re recommended material (I'm assuming some type/color of Woodlands Scenics)?? Model is HO scale. Any pictures of completed lots would be helpful.

thanks in advance,

Country: | Posts: 78

Bsklarski

Posted - 2009 September 24 :  5:10:55 PM  Show Profile
Find some fine sand paper sheets and fool around until you get one that looks right. Then spray paint it and weather it. All of the WS stuff I have seen is too large to stand in for fine enough gravel. You have to remember that its crushed even finer as cars drive all over it.

damnant quodnon intelligunt
***

Brian Sklarski
NECR Engineer



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Country: USA | Posts: 628 Go to Top of Page

RCH

Posted - 2009 September 24 :  7:17:18 PM  Show Profile
I used Woodland Scenics fine buff ballast to do a gravel road on my Free-mo module. I spread it and fixed it in place using the same methods I use for applying ballast. Since the color wasn't close to what I was looking for, I ended up airbrushing it liberally to approximate the color of caliche rock, which is commonly used here as a gravel paving material.


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Kend2001

Posted - 2009 September 24 :  9:43:40 PM  Show Profile  Visit Kend2001's Homepage
I agree and use the same techniques as Ryan. The Fine Buff works great.

Ken
www.mytrainroom.com

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Trapper 13

Posted - 2009 September 24 :  9:58:28 PM  Show Profile
If you have limestone gravel in your area, find a some and get the finest kitchen strainer you can find. You will get almost dust, but it is the real thing.


Country: USA | Posts: 30 Go to Top of Page

INRAIL

Posted - 2009 September 24 :  10:19:13 PM  Show Profile
Highball provides the best ballast materials. I got away from Woodland Scenics years ago (TOO LARGE!). I use the N scale Highball Ballast as much as possible for HO. Also, look at real dirt and sift it through a screen to get the larger materials out of it. You can also check out Scenic Express that has the largest variety and best materials anywhere in all scales IMO. Of course, I'm speaking from my own experiences. I'm not trying to say that others are wrong in what they're doing. Hope this helps.

Tom Johnson



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rayw46

Posted - 2009 September 25 :  08:18:52 AM  Show Profile
Try a product known as, Scenic Sand, that is a very fine material. It's often used to make the multi-colored sand displays in jars. It is sold at craft shops such a Michaels or Jo-Anns. I've also used the sandpaper idea for small areas but for larger areas requiring more than one sheet, its hard to hid the seams.

Ray



Country: USA | Posts: 164 Go to Top of Page

TwoHands

Posted - 2009 September 25 :  11:00:07 PM  Show Profile
Use the finest ballast you can find and glue it down with thinned white glue, matte med, or un-tinted latex paint. BEFORE it hardens roll it down with firm pressure in the traffic pattern.

What horn?

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elansp

Posted - 2009 September 25 :  11:39:03 PM  Show Profile
Thanks for all of the great suggestions....


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k9wrangler

Posted - 2009 September 26 :  09:28:09 AM  Show Profile
Tile grout in the color you want will work well, it is very fine textured and uniform color and available in many colors, mixing of two similar colors will work as well and break up the color a bit. Finely sifted dirt in the appropriate color might work for you, mix up some with the intended adhesive and see if it dries to the color you like. I've found that dirt with dilute white glue dries close to the color you get when it's wet and doesn't alway lighten up to the color it was dry.



Karl Scribner
H.M.F.W.B.I.C.

Sunfield Twp. Michigan

Just a grumpy old man playing with my toy trains!
Friend of SPIKRE

Country: USA | Posts: 2633 Go to Top of Page

pltbrnch

Posted - 2009 September 28 :  12:19:44 AM  Show Profile
What I've done for gravel roads and parking lots is to use real gravel from the side of a road in the actual area you are modeling. I use a strainer to strain out only the very smallest bits of dirt, store it in a small coffee can....this takes a while to do, but is well worth it, since you have the real thing.

Paint the area of the parking lot with a generous amount of tan-light brownish latex paint, and while the paint is STILL WET, sift the dirt over it until covered. Let it dry completely for a few days, then run a "bright-boy" abrasive track cleaner through your parking lot/road in the areas where there is the most vehicle traffic. If needed, you can wet the area again, sift more dirt on, bond it with Matte Medium, and repeat with the bright boy. The real secret to making it look right is scraping in the highly traveled areas with the bright boy.

After you have it to your satisfaction, just vacuum up any excess dirt and you're good to go.



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rayw46

Posted - 2009 September 28 :  11:08:50 AM  Show Profile
quote:
Originally posted by pltbrnch

What I've done for gravel roads and parking lots is to use real gravel from the side of a road in the actual area you are modeling. I use a strainer to strain out only the very smallest bits of dirt, store it in a small coffee can....this takes a while to do, but is well worth it, since you have the real thing.

Paint the area of the parking lot with a generous amount of tan-light brownish latex paint, and while the paint is STILL WET, sift the dirt over it until covered. Let it dry completely for a few days, then run a "bright-boy" abrasive track cleaner through your parking lot/road in the areas where there is the most vehicle traffic. If needed, you can wet the area again, sift more dirt on, bond it with Matte Medium, and repeat with the bright boy. The real secret to making it look right is scraping in the highly traveled areas with the bright boy.

After you have it to your satisfaction, just vacuum up any excess dirt and you're good to go.



This is the traditional way of making dirt roads and it's worked for many a model railroader, but you seem to be talking about dirt and the rest of us are talking about gravel? Are you able to find gravel dust fine enough to make a, "gravel," road or parking lot?

Ray



Edited by - rayw46 on 2009 September 28 11:11:13 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 164 Go to Top of Page

pltbrnch

Posted - 2009 September 28 :  1:36:24 PM  Show Profile
quote:
Originally posted by rayw46

quote:
Originally posted by pltbrnch

What I've done for gravel roads and parking lots is to use real gravel from the side of a road in the actual area you are modeling. I use a strainer to strain out only the very smallest bits of dirt, store it in a small coffee can....this takes a while to do, but is well worth it, since you have the real thing.

Paint the area of the parking lot with a generous amount of tan-light brownish latex paint, and while the paint is STILL WET, sift the dirt over it until covered. Let it dry completely for a few days, then run a "bright-boy" abrasive track cleaner through your parking lot/road in the areas where there is the most vehicle traffic. If needed, you can wet the area again, sift more dirt on, bond it with Matte Medium, and repeat with the bright boy. The real secret to making it look right is scraping in the highly traveled areas with the bright boy.

After you have it to your satisfaction, just vacuum up any excess dirt and you're good to go.



This is the traditional way of making dirt roads and it's worked for many a model railroader, but you seem to be talking about dirt and the rest of us are talking about gravel? Are you able to find gravel dust fine enough to make a, "gravel," road or parking lot?

Ray



Yes, Ray I was able to get very small bits of the gravel to fall through the strainer, along with some dust/dirt of the same general color. Like I said, it takes a while to strain out enough particles for use. Once you run the abrasive over everything, it appears as a packed dirt/gravel road or parking lot.



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Dborn

Posted - 2009 September 28 :  11:06:05 PM  Show Profile
For my "dirt" areas, I go to a well travelled dirt road where a summer's worth of travel has churned the dirt to a flour consistency and fill a coffee can. At home I use an extremely fine sifter to remove pebbles and weed debris. For yard areas where a more grainy look is desired, I mix in some fine beach sand, sifted the same way. Brush on some diluted Elmer's glue and sprinkle the dirt on with a salt shaker. Instant gravel/dirt! Also is a quick way to cover that nasty pink styrofoam and create a base for everything else.

Dave



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