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Author Previous Topic: More progress on layout Topic Next Topic: PRR Help Needed For York Pa
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chappy

Posted - 2008 March 02 :  07:54:48 AM  Show Profile
Here's a quick question. I saw this awhile back and didn't save the answer. So can anyone tell me approximately how wide to make a 2 lane road on my n scale layout? Thanks in advance.
Sr. Chaplain Gary Hosfelt
Pataskala, Ohio

Country: | Posts: 20

oldbill_indy

Posted - 2008 March 02 :  09:57:41 AM  Show Profile
You can make it any width you want. Remember that 3/4" equals 10 feet. A 40 ft wide road would be 3". Do a rough measurement on a road near you that you would like to scale down and go from there.

I insist that Victor gets his Atlantic now!

Country: USA | Posts: 1020 Go to Top of Page

Lou D

Posted - 2008 March 02 :  10:08:30 AM  Show Profile
I'll usually take an N scale vehicle or 2,and put them where I'm making the road,facing in opposite directions.Then I scale the road according to what it is.A backstreet may be barely wide enough for 2 cars to pass,a highway would be wide enough for 2 trucks to pass safely at high speed..


Country: USA | Posts: 3637 Go to Top of Page

Spookshow

Posted - 2008 March 02 :  10:11:29 AM  Show Profile  Visit Spookshow's Homepage
I find that 2.5" looks about right for a typical two-lane blacktop rural road.

Cheers,
-Mark



Dear Atlas - Please Make More DME/ICE Models!

Country: USA | Posts: 5560 Go to Top of Page

jacobmarley

Posted - 2008 March 02 :  11:21:34 AM  Show Profile
Spookshow/Mark, are country roads 33 feet wide? I'm just about to start measuring mine out. I'm glad this thread came up, because I had cut paper strips for mine to approximate where the roads would go, and the strips I cut were just 1 1/4" wide. I guess that would make a road 16 1/2 feet wide. Put that way, it sounds a little tiny.

I guess it depends on what type of road it is. I just looked in Marty McGuirk's book "N Scale Model Railroading". For his little layout, he was using cork roadbed as a base for the road, then either cutting styrene for paved roads, or topping it with paste and dirt for the dirt roads. He was cutting the styrene roads to be 24 scale feet. What is that? About 1 3/4"?


Al

Happiness can be found, even in the darkest of times, if one only remembers to turn on the light. ~Albus Dumbledore

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SkipFranandFun

Posted - 2008 March 02 :  11:37:39 AM  Show Profile
quote:
Originally posted by Lou D

I'll usually take an N scale vehicle or 2,and put them where I'm making the road,facing in opposite directions.Then I scale the road according to what it is.A backstreet may be barely wide enough for 2 cars to pass,a highway would be wide enough for 2 trucks to pass safely at high speed..


Good test. For me that means 2" minimum for two semi's side by side. Somewhere between 2" and Mark's 2.5" ought to work.

Skip



Edited by - SkipFranandFun on 2008 March 02 11:39:21 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 2283 Go to Top of Page

Boilerman

Posted - 2008 March 02 :  1:33:05 PM  Show Profile
This is a question that is often ask.
It depends on the era and location which you are modeling.
I work all over the US and roads out West are quite wide and on the East Coast they tend to be narrow.
If your neighborhood is old then the roads are narrow, if new they tend to be wider.

All before me have posted a correct answer to your question.

I myself do what looks good to me for the area that I need the road, taking into account the type of area and vintage of it,
the vintage will also play a part in what the road is or is not paved with.


Boilerman

Country: USA | Posts: 248 Go to Top of Page

Roger Perkins

Posted - 2008 March 02 :  1:35:26 PM  Show Profile  Visit Roger Perkins's Homepage
I confess! I contributed to a topic about street and road width and significant information was exchanged. Probably about 1 year ago.

The answer is relative to the location.
As suggested there is the simple approach of placing two n-scale vehicle beside each other and then estimate from that point. If it is a city street with parallel parking on both sides add width for that.

If it is a simple country, "dirty or gravel" road, the width may only be about the width of one vehicle.

I did streets in the village similar to my hometown to allow for diagonal parking on both sides; that is two vehicles side by side for traffic then add two vehicles end to end to give ample parking on each side.

The other factor on width is era.

If you are modelling Salt Lake City, Utah, check the reference books...they have some very wide streets as I recall.



Edited by - Roger Perkins on 2008 March 03 09:43:49 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 3351 Go to Top of Page

chappy

Posted - 2008 March 02 :  3:51:33 PM  Show Profile
WOW...Thanks for all the information. At least I have somewhere to satrt now.

This forum is great!


Sr. Chaplain Gary Hosfelt
Pataskala, Ohio

Country: | Posts: 20 Go to Top of Page

andrejonc

Posted - 2008 March 02 :  8:36:49 PM  Show Profile
Hi Gary,

First I would like to welcome you to the Atlas forum, here you will find trains minded people, always ready the help newcomers in this wonderful hobby of model railroading.

As for my self, Iím the Old man trying his best to please the guys, thatís not a easy one because they are even better then me, so what.

Now for your question, the following product that I love to work with is made in Germany by BUSH, Walter as a sale on this product for $6.49@.

http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/189-7087

I use them mainly because they are easy to install without having to use plaster type contraption, also you donít make a mess of it. Each road has two lanes and if you wish to have a four cars highway you simply install two roads in parallel to each other and in the center you can install lamp posts.

Thatís my two bits for to night.

andrejonc



Country: Canada | Posts: 694 Go to Top of Page

mk

Posted - 2008 March 02 :  11:51:41 PM  Show Profile
Interesting that is says it's 1-1/2" wide!


Country: USA | Posts: 1218 Go to Top of Page

outdoorsfellar

Posted - 2008 March 03 :  12:09:33 AM  Show Profile
Hey Chappy, Newark area here !


Country: USA | Posts: 128 Go to Top of Page

nkalanaga

Posted - 2008 March 03 :  12:21:45 AM  Show Profile
Into the 50s most highways had at least 8 foot lanes. Since then they've gotten wider, and most now would have at least 10 foot, and many 12 foot. Two 12 foot lanes would be 1 13/16 inches wide, leaving 3/16 for fog lines and shoulder edges. Add shoulders and a modern 1 lane road would be about 3 inches wide. On the other hand, US 60 in front of our house was built before 1970, and has about 10 foot lanes and a few inches past the fog lines, with no shoulders, or maybe 1 5/8 inches in N scale.

I wouldn't go much under that for a paved road from the 60s or later, as it would look crowded if you have any large trucks on it. 60 can look crowded when two trucks pass as it is!


N. Kalanaga
Be well.

Country: USA | Posts: 4452 Go to Top of Page

Kodiak Island Modeler

Posted - 2008 March 03 :  07:02:41 AM  Show Profile
I followed one of these threads a while back, and carefully used the measurements for my layout. I just never could get anything to please me optically. I finally just sat the cars on the layout and drew my roadlines around them. For country roads I sat two cars side by side, and for my city I did the same but added parked cars on either side of them. I know it's not "right", but I'm lazy, and it worked for me.


Country: USA | Posts: 1206 Go to Top of Page

Roger Perkins

Posted - 2008 March 03 :  09:42:35 AM  Show Profile  Visit Roger Perkins's Homepage

The date on the photo indicates this is from 2007 when I elected to use Funky Foam to model the asphalt streets in my home village area.
This is a village of population 500 or less; there are no defined parking spaces. In my youth, I recall people parking as close as possible to the retail business they were going.
They might cross the oncoming lane of traffic to park on the opposite side of the road.



Country: USA | Posts: 3351 Go to Top of Page

oldbill_indy

Posted - 2008 March 03 :  11:52:07 AM  Show Profile
I would say that 10 ft lanes would be a little narrow in todays world. A 84 passenger school bus is 10 ft wide--outside mirror to outside mirror. I have seen buses lose their mirrors on a narrow road by a dump truck coming in the opposite direction.

I insist that Victor gets his Atlantic now!

Country: USA | Posts: 1020 Go to Top of Page
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