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central.vermont

Posted - 2005 March 12 :  9:34:00 PM  Show Profile
WOW jym!!!!
That is nice looking.

Jon


If your not modeling N scale then you're taking up way too much space!!!!

Edited by - central.vermont on 2005 March 12 9:34:54 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 622 Go to Top of Page

steamghost

Posted - 2005 March 12 :  9:47:43 PM  Show Profile
Your logging railroad would need MOW-type cars: tool storage, parts storage including a repair car carrying ties and track, perhaps even crew cars. Find a small crane to put in one of the open wagons.

Jim Maurer's bobber is great! You can come up with a similar great scheme for your caboose or just make it faded wood/rusting steel.



Edited by - steamghost on 2005 March 12 9:52:52 PM

Country: | Posts: 530 Go to Top of Page

steamghost

Posted - 2005 March 12 :  9:47:43 PM  Show Profile
Your logging railroad would need MOW-type cars: tool storage, parts storage including a repair car carrying ties and track, perhaps even crew cars. Find a small crane to put in one of the open wagons.

Jim Maurer's bobber is great! You can come up with a similar great scheme for your caboose or just make it faded wood/rusting steel.



Edited by - steamghost on 2005 March 12 9:52:52 PM

Country: | Posts: 530 Go to Top of Page

brokemoto

Posted - 2005 March 13 :  02:57:18 AM  Show Profile
Nice work, j-y-m and GM.

You can bash the English brakemen's van into a convincing North American industrial hack with a minimum of cutting/sanding/filing/adding some details and painting. You can also do this to the several Kato JNR brakemen's vans out there.

Many of the geared locomotives' users could barely afford the locomotive, so they could not often afford to buy 'store-built', if you will, rolling stock. Thus, a large amount of home-built rolling stock rolled behind geared locomotives. You could bash that English rolling stock into convincing 'home-built' US rolling stock with a minimum of cutting/sanding/filing/adding details/painting.

If you still MUST have a B-mann caboose, you can often find them at shows. Some FLHS also have them in white cardboard boxes as NOS. If you live near where they have Greenberg Shows, you can check with the 'Bachmann Babes'; they sell them for about five dollars apiece.

I did talk to the 'Bachmann Babes' at Edison, New Jersey. They did say that they would not be at either the Timonium, Maryland G-berg or the Howard Zane show there in April. They did say that they would be back on the show circuit in the summer.

If you still want a B-personn bobber caboose, I might have a few extra floating around, but I will have to look. I still have not unpacked even twenty-five per-cent of the stuff from when I moved at the end of this past summer.

Thank you for your consideration and support.



Country: USA | Posts: 2800 Go to Top of Page

brokemoto

Posted - 2005 March 13 :  02:57:18 AM  Show Profile
Nice work, j-y-m and GM.

You can bash the English brakemen's van into a convincing North American industrial hack with a minimum of cutting/sanding/filing/adding some details and painting. You can also do this to the several Kato JNR brakemen's vans out there.

Many of the geared locomotives' users could barely afford the locomotive, so they could not often afford to buy 'store-built', if you will, rolling stock. Thus, a large amount of home-built rolling stock rolled behind geared locomotives. You could bash that English rolling stock into convincing 'home-built' US rolling stock with a minimum of cutting/sanding/filing/adding details/painting.

If you still MUST have a B-mann caboose, you can often find them at shows. Some FLHS also have them in white cardboard boxes as NOS. If you live near where they have Greenberg Shows, you can check with the 'Bachmann Babes'; they sell them for about five dollars apiece.

I did talk to the 'Bachmann Babes' at Edison, New Jersey. They did say that they would not be at either the Timonium, Maryland G-berg or the Howard Zane show there in April. They did say that they would be back on the show circuit in the summer.

If you still want a B-personn bobber caboose, I might have a few extra floating around, but I will have to look. I still have not unpacked even twenty-five per-cent of the stuff from when I moved at the end of this past summer.

Thank you for your consideration and support.



Country: USA | Posts: 2800 Go to Top of Page

randgust

Posted - 2005 March 13 :  09:51:31 AM  Show Profile  Visit randgust's Homepage
Pennsylvania RR had at least one major class of four-wheel bobber cabooses with a steel frame. That appears to be the basis of most of the Rapido & Bachmann models. It's american, just unusual, because most were scrapped. Tyco & AHM ones in HO are similar, too.

http://www.20thcenturyhobbies.com/trainnut/NonELprototype/PRR4765824wheelcabooseNOPA.JPG

This one is in Gettysburg, PA in 1999. Strasburg Railroad has two, I think, one in operational condition - beautiful restorations. There's a couple more survivors out there.

Now the good part is on this that I know that at least one PA logger - the Sheffield & Tionesta, bought used PRR stuff regularly. They had two four-wheel bobbers for log trains - one 'off the shelf' PRR one (caboose #6) and another similar looking caboose only older - and no cupola - #2. Looks just like Michigan Centrals work on the LNE caboose - just beat to pieces. The photos in Walt Caslers "Sheffield & Tionesta" book show them as derelicts, heavily weathered, and abandonded, in the 1940's. But they were 4-wheel ex-PRR cabooses on a logging railroad, so there. You're OK by me. Sorry I can't post photos, but they aren't mine and it's copyrighted.

That's the good news. But other than those two cabooses, I've never seen four-wheel logging railroad equipment except for disconnect log bunkers. The reason was simple, actually. Track was rough, loads were heavy, and rail was often 50-60lb per yard. You needed eight-wheel log cars and equipment, because the track couldn't handle heavier axle loadings. Even 23-25 foot log cars (like Alan Curtis now makes) had two trucks.

S&T had a wonderful oddball roster because they had common-carrier status and ran passenger trains. The railroad was built after 1900 so it ran with old civil-war (and older) passenger cars and PRR hand-me-down stuff. They had a snowplow flatcar with a crew hut, open excursion coaches, passenger cars (monitor and clerestory), a handful of boxcars, flatcars, a pair of 4-4-0's in passenger service - just wonderful stuff. It was torn up in 1946. My father the lumberman even made an attempt to buy it and keep it operating, but the ICC allowed scrapping for war material.

I borrow liberally from the S&T for some of my Hickory Valley Railroad practices - HVRR never used a caboose so I made an 8-wheel shorty that looks like an S&T job. Same with passenger cars.



Edited by - randgust on 2005 March 13 09:59:38 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 4410 Go to Top of Page

randgust

Posted - 2005 March 13 :  09:51:31 AM  Show Profile  Visit randgust's Homepage
Pennsylvania RR had at least one major class of four-wheel bobber cabooses with a steel frame. That appears to be the basis of most of the Rapido & Bachmann models. It's american, just unusual, because most were scrapped. Tyco & AHM ones in HO are similar, too.

http://www.20thcenturyhobbies.com/trainnut/NonELprototype/PRR4765824wheelcabooseNOPA.JPG

This one is in Gettysburg, PA in 1999. Strasburg Railroad has two, I think, one in operational condition - beautiful restorations. There's a couple more survivors out there.

Now the good part is on this that I know that at least one PA logger - the Sheffield & Tionesta, bought used PRR stuff regularly. They had two four-wheel bobbers for log trains - one 'off the shelf' PRR one (caboose #6) and another similar looking caboose only older - and no cupola - #2. Looks just like Michigan Centrals work on the LNE caboose - just beat to pieces. The photos in Walt Caslers "Sheffield & Tionesta" book show them as derelicts, heavily weathered, and abandonded, in the 1940's. But they were 4-wheel ex-PRR cabooses on a logging railroad, so there. You're OK by me. Sorry I can't post photos, but they aren't mine and it's copyrighted.

That's the good news. But other than those two cabooses, I've never seen four-wheel logging railroad equipment except for disconnect log bunkers. The reason was simple, actually. Track was rough, loads were heavy, and rail was often 50-60lb per yard. You needed eight-wheel log cars and equipment, because the track couldn't handle heavier axle loadings. Even 23-25 foot log cars (like Alan Curtis now makes) had two trucks.

S&T had a wonderful oddball roster because they had common-carrier status and ran passenger trains. The railroad was built after 1900 so it ran with old civil-war (and older) passenger cars and PRR hand-me-down stuff. They had a snowplow flatcar with a crew hut, open excursion coaches, passenger cars (monitor and clerestory), a handful of boxcars, flatcars, a pair of 4-4-0's in passenger service - just wonderful stuff. It was torn up in 1946. My father the lumberman even made an attempt to buy it and keep it operating, but the ICC allowed scrapping for war material.

I borrow liberally from the S&T for some of my Hickory Valley Railroad practices - HVRR never used a caboose so I made an 8-wheel shorty that looks like an S&T job. Same with passenger cars.



Edited by - randgust on 2005 March 13 09:59:38 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 4410 Go to Top of Page

Chris333

Posted - 2005 March 13 :  10:35:15 AM  Show Profile
W.M. Ritter Lumber in WV had a 4 wheel caboose. It was later used on the Elk River Coal & Lumber RR. until around 1955. Then Georgia Pacific used the same caboose in 1962.

Photos are in the book " West Virginia Logging Railroads"

I used those photo to make one. I didn't like the way the wheels came out so I just threw a set of trucks under it.



With the trucks, it looked tall so I cut the height down and added a cupola





http://www.trainboard.com/railimages/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=3174
http://picasaweb.google.com/ErieChris333
http://www.youtube.com/user/Schmuck804
http://community.webshots.com/user/chris333333

Country: | Posts: 3958 Go to Top of Page

Chris333

Posted - 2005 March 13 :  10:35:15 AM  Show Profile
W.M. Ritter Lumber in WV had a 4 wheel caboose. It was later used on the Elk River Coal & Lumber RR. until around 1955. Then Georgia Pacific used the same caboose in 1962.

Photos are in the book " West Virginia Logging Railroads"

I used those photo to make one. I didn't like the way the wheels came out so I just threw a set of trucks under it.



With the trucks, it looked tall so I cut the height down and added a cupola





http://www.trainboard.com/railimages/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=3174
http://picasaweb.google.com/ErieChris333
http://www.youtube.com/user/Schmuck804
http://community.webshots.com/user/chris333333

Country: | Posts: 3958 Go to Top of Page

KVRS

Posted - 2005 March 13 :  12:46:49 PM  Show Profile
Sometimes I regret my decision to model in N scale, there's just so much available in HO rolling stock and modeling materials and accessories. But then! Then I see what fine work is being done by N scale modelers like you guys and I get all energized again! You guys should try to get published! I can see no reason why there should be a shortage of N scale material for the mags!

I bought the Peco's as fodder for developement. The latest Fine Scale RR annual is based on logging, Shays etc. and has lots of pictures for inspiration. At first I considered bashing one of Atlas' latest caboose offerings creating a shorter hack. Randy's comments above have me thinking about developing "short" cars of different types from 70 ton ore cars. JYM's little wooden caboose shows what can be done from scratch, but I'm still getting accustomed to working with wood; Evergreen styrene is currently my material of choice. (same thing only different) And, there's the Model Tech Studios and DRM Logging cars. Something tells me I'm going to need one of those lighted magnifiers on an articulated arm for my work bench! (all this desire for a "bobber" caboose started from a recent HO mag article!)



Country: Canada | Posts: 58 Go to Top of Page

KVRS

Posted - 2005 March 13 :  12:46:49 PM  Show Profile
Sometimes I regret my decision to model in N scale, there's just so much available in HO rolling stock and modeling materials and accessories. But then! Then I see what fine work is being done by N scale modelers like you guys and I get all energized again! You guys should try to get published! I can see no reason why there should be a shortage of N scale material for the mags!

I bought the Peco's as fodder for developement. The latest Fine Scale RR annual is based on logging, Shays etc. and has lots of pictures for inspiration. At first I considered bashing one of Atlas' latest caboose offerings creating a shorter hack. Randy's comments above have me thinking about developing "short" cars of different types from 70 ton ore cars. JYM's little wooden caboose shows what can be done from scratch, but I'm still getting accustomed to working with wood; Evergreen styrene is currently my material of choice. (same thing only different) And, there's the Model Tech Studios and DRM Logging cars. Something tells me I'm going to need one of those lighted magnifiers on an articulated arm for my work bench! (all this desire for a "bobber" caboose started from a recent HO mag article!)



Country: Canada | Posts: 58 Go to Top of Page

randgust

Posted - 2005 March 13 :  1:27:51 PM  Show Profile  Visit randgust's Homepage
If you need short cars, start with the Bachmann 'old time' series. That basic flatcar body can be used for just about everything - log cars, bark cars & chemical wood cars (common here in PA), equipment flats, wood-side gondolas, etc. Very typical of what I have photos of. This one took WAY too much time to do, but it is probably my favorite HVRR car - the split chemical wood (cull stuff too small to cut for lumber) was sent to an acetone distallation plant in Mayburg, PA:



Bachmann 'tank car' with the tanks tossed, deck painted with Floquil foundation and weathered, MT archbar trucks added.



Santa Fe Albuquerque Third District in N
Man is a tool-using animal. Without tools he is nothing,
with tools he is all. Thomas Carlyle (1795 - 1881)


Country: USA | Posts: 4410 Go to Top of Page

randgust

Posted - 2005 March 13 :  1:27:51 PM  Show Profile  Visit randgust's Homepage
If you need short cars, start with the Bachmann 'old time' series. That basic flatcar body can be used for just about everything - log cars, bark cars & chemical wood cars (common here in PA), equipment flats, wood-side gondolas, etc. Very typical of what I have photos of. This one took WAY too much time to do, but it is probably my favorite HVRR car - the split chemical wood (cull stuff too small to cut for lumber) was sent to an acetone distallation plant in Mayburg, PA:



Bachmann 'tank car' with the tanks tossed, deck painted with Floquil foundation and weathered, MT archbar trucks added.



Santa Fe Albuquerque Third District in N
Man is a tool-using animal. Without tools he is nothing,
with tools he is all. Thomas Carlyle (1795 - 1881)


Country: USA | Posts: 4410 Go to Top of Page

Charlie Vlk

Posted - 2005 March 13 :  2:16:22 PM  Show Profile
The Bachmann Bobber Caboose was available as a separate item, just like the rest of the "Old Timer" cars in the same series.
There also was a Arnold Rapido caboose which appeared to be a B&O prototype. No doubt some are still lurking out there in dusty boxes in small hobbyshops.
Charlie Vlk



Country: USA | Posts: 1704 Go to Top of Page

Charlie Vlk

Posted - 2005 March 13 :  2:16:22 PM  Show Profile
The Bachmann Bobber Caboose was available as a separate item, just like the rest of the "Old Timer" cars in the same series.
There also was a Arnold Rapido caboose which appeared to be a B&O prototype. No doubt some are still lurking out there in dusty boxes in small hobbyshops.
Charlie Vlk



Country: USA | Posts: 1704 Go to Top of Page
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