Atlas Model Railroad Co. - 1900’s steam schooner kitbash (NSF 56k)
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 1900’s steam schooner kitbash (NSF 56k)
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160Pennsy

Posted - 2005 January 21 :  4:56:47 PM  Show Profile
Brief History lesson - By the late 1850’s dozens of logging camps and sawmills on the rugged coasts of California & Oregon gave rise to the Pacific Coast lumber trade. Throughout the early 1900’s sailing schooners and steam schooners formed the backbone of maritime trade and commerce on this coast. Steam schooners were hardy little wooden-hulled steamers originally rigged with auxillary sails, hence their “schooner” name.


The steam schooners were specially designed ships for use in this rugged Pacific Coast lumber trade, where few good harbors or harbor improvements existed. Sand bars at the mouths of rivers, reefs, rocks, and winter storms all had a hand in the evolution of this unique class of ships.



The steam schooner era lasted from 1888 to 1921, during which time, approximately 228 wooden ships were constructed. World War one’s aftermath (glut of steel ships) and the Great Depression killed them off. The last one, Wapama, operated until 1946 and is currently sitting on a barge at the San Francisco Maritime museum., waiting for restoration to continue.

When the N-scale Atlas Shay locomotive was announced , I began researching lumber industry layout ideas where the Shay could be used. Along with the lumber industry I also wanted to include a harbor, so that I could also model some fishing ships. The steam schooner loaded w/ cut lumber delivered by the Shay, the Pacific Northwest coast, and the Salmon fishing industry in the early 1900’s fit all my requirements so the mold was cast

Kitbash details to follow...
Paul Ohegyi

Country: USA | Posts: 124

160Pennsy

Posted - 2005 January 21 :  5:01:07 PM  Show Profile
1. I started this project with the 1/142 scale Revell Northsea fishing trawler plastic kit. This kit is available on “That Auction Site”, or online hobby retailers that carry plastic models of ships. Some well stocked LHS even carry this kit. I happened to get mine ($10) from a fellow N-TRAK club member who had previously grabbed 2 from a Model Expo closeout.



2. The 2 hull halves were glued together along with the deck, using Tenax. I then laid the hull on it’s side and band sawed it to make a waterline model. To figure out where the water line would be on a loaded ship, I used the reference photos. **Note** while cutting the hull on a band saw and sanding smooth the bottom, the plastic shavings will heat up, bunch up and stick to the hull, so take it slow and remove these as necessary.



3. Next came some .060 styrene to cover the new hole in the bottom of the hull, and to give it a nice level surface to rest on. Some sanding / shaping was necessary to get the new hull bottom looking right. I have not decided if I want to leave the hull side surface as is or if I should scribe wood plank detail into it?




Paul Ohegyi

Edited by - 160Pennsy on 2005 January 21 11:07:36 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 124 Go to Top of Page

160Pennsy

Posted - 2005 January 21 :  5:01:07 PM  Show Profile
1. I started this project with the 1/142 scale Revell Northsea fishing trawler plastic kit. This kit is available on “That Auction Site”, or online hobby retailers that carry plastic models of ships. Some well stocked LHS even carry this kit. I happened to get mine ($10) from a fellow N-TRAK club member who had previously grabbed 2 from a Model Expo closeout.



2. The 2 hull halves were glued together along with the deck, using Tenax. I then laid the hull on it’s side and band sawed it to make a waterline model. To figure out where the water line would be on a loaded ship, I used the reference photos. **Note** while cutting the hull on a band saw and sanding smooth the bottom, the plastic shavings will heat up, bunch up and stick to the hull, so take it slow and remove these as necessary.



3. Next came some .060 styrene to cover the new hole in the bottom of the hull, and to give it a nice level surface to rest on. Some sanding / shaping was necessary to get the new hull bottom looking right. I have not decided if I want to leave the hull side surface as is or if I should scribe wood plank detail into it?




Paul Ohegyi

Edited by - 160Pennsy on 2005 January 21 11:07:36 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 124 Go to Top of Page

160Pennsy

Posted - 2005 January 21 :  5:08:11 PM  Show Profile
4. The 3 box-like deck protrusions (items E) were removed and the holes were filled in with styrene. I also scribed in deck planks & some wood grain but once the cut lumber loads are placed on the deck, this detail will probably be covered up anyways.



5. From the reference photos & drawings I had, the lumber loads would be placed on the open deck as well as along the lower cabin sides on the steam schooners. To leave more room for lumber loads on the cabin sides, I moved the lower cabin inward approx. 2 deck planks, by shaving off the nibs provided for gluing the cabin sides. I will add new nibs from square styrene stock later, once the new lower cabin sides are built.



Next comes the lower cabin construction...


Paul Ohegyi

Country: USA | Posts: 124 Go to Top of Page

160Pennsy

Posted - 2005 January 21 :  5:08:11 PM  Show Profile
4. The 3 box-like deck protrusions (items E) were removed and the holes were filled in with styrene. I also scribed in deck planks & some wood grain but once the cut lumber loads are placed on the deck, this detail will probably be covered up anyways.



5. From the reference photos & drawings I had, the lumber loads would be placed on the open deck as well as along the lower cabin sides on the steam schooners. To leave more room for lumber loads on the cabin sides, I moved the lower cabin inward approx. 2 deck planks, by shaving off the nibs provided for gluing the cabin sides. I will add new nibs from square styrene stock later, once the new lower cabin sides are built.



Next comes the lower cabin construction...


Paul Ohegyi

Country: USA | Posts: 124 Go to Top of Page

sam

Posted - 2005 January 21 :  5:09:20 PM  Show Profile
looking good so far paul!{:)]
i was thinking of something along this line for a future logging module.
so i'd love to see more pics...
keep posting as progress permits


sam

Country: USA | Posts: 3405 Go to Top of Page

sam

Posted - 2005 January 21 :  5:09:20 PM  Show Profile
looking good so far paul!{:)]
i was thinking of something along this line for a future logging module.
so i'd love to see more pics...
keep posting as progress permits


sam

Country: USA | Posts: 3405 Go to Top of Page

randgust

Posted - 2005 January 21 :  6:03:59 PM  Show Profile  Visit randgust's Homepage
Way cool... I gotta look in my library and see what references I have.

I've been up the northern California coast and found it fascinating. One of the more interesting quirks was the offshore loading of ships from cableways. Don't know if rails were ever on a bluff offloading to a cableway to a ship, but MAN, what a scene to model if it was!



Santa Fe Albuquerque Third District in N
Man is a tool-using animal. Without tools he is nothing,
with tools he is all. Thomas Carlyle (1795 - 1881)


Country: USA | Posts: 4410 Go to Top of Page

randgust

Posted - 2005 January 21 :  6:03:59 PM  Show Profile  Visit randgust's Homepage
Way cool... I gotta look in my library and see what references I have.

I've been up the northern California coast and found it fascinating. One of the more interesting quirks was the offshore loading of ships from cableways. Don't know if rails were ever on a bluff offloading to a cableway to a ship, but MAN, what a scene to model if it was!



Santa Fe Albuquerque Third District in N
Man is a tool-using animal. Without tools he is nothing,
with tools he is all. Thomas Carlyle (1795 - 1881)


Country: USA | Posts: 4410 Go to Top of Page

fhmarch

Posted - 2005 January 21 :  7:08:05 PM  Show Profile
Very cool, appreciate the photos and instruction.

I think the new Atlas Shay and some logging loads would look great on the shore (or dock) next to your ship.


FredM

Country: USA | Posts: 57 Go to Top of Page

fhmarch

Posted - 2005 January 21 :  7:08:05 PM  Show Profile
Very cool, appreciate the photos and instruction.

I think the new Atlas Shay and some logging loads would look great on the shore (or dock) next to your ship.


FredM

Country: USA | Posts: 57 Go to Top of Page

randgust

Posted - 2005 January 21 :  7:21:42 PM  Show Profile  Visit randgust's Homepage
OK, found what I was looking for.

"This was Railroading", George Abdill, page 187, shows the harbor at Coos Bay Oregon, with a 4-4-0, boxcars, a combine, log car, and three of those schooners tied up to the dock. Really nice shot.

That book has an abundance of rail and water shots along rivers, in Tacoma with sailing ships, ferries, steamboats, etc.

Good luck with the model and keep posting progress!




Country: USA | Posts: 4410 Go to Top of Page

randgust

Posted - 2005 January 21 :  7:21:42 PM  Show Profile  Visit randgust's Homepage
OK, found what I was looking for.

"This was Railroading", George Abdill, page 187, shows the harbor at Coos Bay Oregon, with a 4-4-0, boxcars, a combine, log car, and three of those schooners tied up to the dock. Really nice shot.

That book has an abundance of rail and water shots along rivers, in Tacoma with sailing ships, ferries, steamboats, etc.

Good luck with the model and keep posting progress!




Country: USA | Posts: 4410 Go to Top of Page
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